Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath

AS SUPERSTORM Sandy continued getting in its final punches Tuesday across the eastern US, one of Appalachia’s largest operators told ILN its operations had fared relatively well.
Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath Appalachian mining keeps moving despite Sandy's wrath

 

Donna Schmidt

Consol Energy spokeswoman Lynn Seay said as of midday Tuesday no shifts at any of its mines had been cancelled due to the storm and while several of its West Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania operations had experienced minimal power outages, production had not been impacted by the disruptions.

Its southwestern Virginia operations, including the Buchanan complex, so far had the most interruption from Sandy’s visit, Seay said, with reported widespread power outages and heavy, wet snow throughout the area Monday night.

Scattered power issues continued there Tuesday.

Consol’s Baltimore terminal in Maryland appears to have escaped the storm unscathed.

“[It] was evacuated on Sunday and secured in anticipation of the storm,” she said.

“We have not received an update on any damage or impacts as of noon [New York time] today.”

Seay confirmed Consol’s river division had been monitoring the storm since last Friday.

On Monday, officials deployed its vessels at “strategically placed stationary sites” where it had secured its barge fleet.

“Our stockpile locations are ready to receive coal if it cannot continue to be moved on the rivers due to flooding in the coming days,” she said.

Because Sandy has not quite shown herself the door – the after-effects could linger over the country through the week – the Pennsylvania-based producer is continuing to monitor storm conditions and barometric pressures.

It added staff to its central command center Monday and those individuals will remain for the next several days to oversee incoming reports.

“We have procedures and practices in place to reduce our risk related to the storm,” Seay said.

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