An existential crisis

MINING could be in trouble as demands for skills continue to grow but the number of people wanting to enter the industry dwindles.

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A lot of attention is being paid to the job losses that will come with the introduction of autonomous haul trucks.

However, what that move into automation has done is shine a light on the skills mining needs and is struggling to get.

Along with mechatronic engineers, there is need for change management professionals, data scientists and drone pilots to name but a few.

The problem is, the sort of people going into those jobs are not coming to mining.

Part of that seems to be because students do not even perceive mining as a viable career pathway.

Youth research agency YouthInsight recently surveyed 1061 senior high school students and first year university students aged between 15 and 20.

It found their knowledge of mining careers was ex...