Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required

THE coal handling and preparation maintenance team at Glencore’s Ravensworth mine in New South Wales has developed a safer and less onerous way of removing crusher teeth than the conventional methods using a sledgehammer.

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Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required Pull crusher teeth. Sledgehammer not required
Crusher teeth require replacement up to three times a year.  
 
This maintenance task traditionally involves the use of a 6.4kg copper sledgehammer to strike the used teeth, loosening them so they can be removed.
 
There are 116 teeth on the crusher, each requiring an average eight hits with the hammer by a maintenance technician, which equates to 928 strikes to remove all the teeth.
 
The constant swinging and striking with the sledgehammer poses significant fatigue, ergonomic and soft tissue injury risks to the maintenance technician undertaking the teeth removal.  
 
A safer method was needed to eliminate the use of the sledgehammer.