Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls

COAL mines using remote controlled equipment should have robust maintenance and cleaning procedures for associated remote control transmitters, including documented pre-use checks, NSW Mine Safety has warned, after a continuous miner continued to tram forward when the remote control deadman button was released.
Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls Continuous miner incidents prompt warning on remote controls

 

Lou Caruana

Remote transmitters were not upgraded to dual deadman operation for select functions, and the mine was unaware of this option.

“Mines should also have, and use, document control systems to ensure that safety and technical bulletins relating to equipment are passed to the correct personnel to ensure any recommendations around equipment upgrades and improvements are properly considered and assessed,” Mine Safety warned in its latest incident update.

In a separate incident, while a continuous miner was in a surface workshop for overhaul, the "E" stop junction boxes were being removed for overhaul and it was found the cable sheaths were cut down to fit into the glands.

“Coal mines should ensure their electrical trades and engineers are trained and assessed as competent for work on explosion protected hazardous area equipment,” Mine Safety said.

“Maintenance inspections should detail checks for correct glanding of cables into explosion protected enclosures.”

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