Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines

MINE workers across Australia are being caught with synthetic drugs in their system, with a detection firm finding they were three times more likely to test positive than any other sector.
Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines Synthetic drug use rife in Australian mines

 

Sadie Davidson

Oil and gas and coal miners have been the biggest culprits, according to the Drug Detection Agency.

The increasing popularity of synthetic drugs, particularly cannabis, has prompted Crime Stoppers Queensland to launch its Synthetic Drugs: Real Damage campaign.

The DDA recorded at least 420 "non-negative" results as it tested 12,760 workers last year.

The resource industry’s random and compulsory drug testing is believed to have deterred many from taking the substance.

However it is thought hat before synthetic marijuana was made illegal and testing came into place, many more miners would have been exposed to the drug.

Large disposable incomes have been attributed to the rise in drug use among miners.

Mount Isa was recent given the label the “synthetic drug capital of Queensland” by the ABC, boosted by its high mining population.

Synthetic cannabis product Kronic has been banned after it gained popularity in the mining industries of Queensland and Western Australia.

Last year the body-building supplement Jack3d was also banned on Bowen Basin mines following reports workers were using it to stay awake.

Late last year, a new synthetic drug known as Venom was touted as the “next generation of Kronic” after it was released in WA.

It is hoped new testing methods along with heavy penalties will squash the use of the substances on Australian mine sites.

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