Moranbah, Dysart schoolies bound for mines

FIFTY-six students from the Moranbah and Dysart state high schools will receive funding from the Mining Industry Skills Centre to attend Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy (QMEA) schools in a bid to help find a long-term solution to the skills shortage.
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Moranbah State High School students participating in the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy training program.

Angie Tomlinson

The funding allows the schools to prepare interested students for a career in the resources sector through completion of Certificate I in Resource and Infrastructure Operations at QMEA.

The QMEA’s course is unique in that students are placed with an industry mentor and undertake classroom learning and practical exercises as well as minesite visits.

“Placing them with an industry mentor also means that the risk for sites is minimised, which was a concern raised by industry,” QMEA coordinator Delay Nugent said.

Combined, the two QMEA schools have 745 students and the course will result in more than 330 new competencies.

Nugent said that the students must go through an application process to be selected to participate in the course.

“This course, which has been developed in response to industry demand, is really about identifying those students who have an interest in pursuing a career in the mining industry and is seen as a privilege to be selected to participate," Nugent said.

Funding through the MISC Training Funding Program is available to all Queensland mining industry companies, both small and large, to assist in the development and implementation of training programs.

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