Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves

CARBON Energy says independent testing of its underground coal gasification syngas reserves at the Bloodwood Creek site in Queensland’s Surat Basin show the site will support a power station and ammonia and synthetic natural gas plants for the next 15 years.
Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves Carbon Energy confirms UCG syngas reserves

Flaring of Syngas

Angie Tomlinson

In a world first, Carbon Energy obtained independent certification of its UCG reserves using Society of Petroleum Engineers guidelines, with MHA Petroleum Consultants certifying 2P (proven and probable) reserves at approximately 744 petajoules.

Traditionally, syngas reserves have been estimated using the JORC code that measures available coal reserves. SPE, on the other hand, assesses the available syngas volumes and is used by coal seam gasification players.

The reserves are expected to support a 300-megawatt base load power station, an ammonia plant, and a 20PJ per annum synthetic natural gas plant.

Carbon managing director Andrew Dash said he expected the reserves would be added to through further exploration.

“This is an important step in the development of a national UCG market as it is the first time that UCG syngas volumes have had independent third-party certification under the SPE guidelines anywhere in the world,” Dash said.

Earlier this month, Carbon Energy launched Australia’s first UCG powered plant, currently being constructed at Bloodwood Creek, with first electricity expected by early next year.

Plans are also well underway to build an additional 20-25MW power station on the same site, a project that will incorporate carbon capture and storage techniques, through a partnership with Queensland-based ZeroGen.

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