Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure

THE Queensland government wants to partner with some of Queensland’s largest mining companies to create a voluntary Resources Community Infrastructure Fund and in return is offering to freeze royalty rates on coal and minerals for three years.
Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure Qld govt seeks voluntary donations from mining companies for infrastructure

Queensland Treasurer Jackie Trad.

Queensland Treasurer Jackie Trad said to get the fund rolling, the government would invest $30 million, and was looking for contributions from mining companies on a voluntary basis.

 

The fund will be targeted at improving economic and social infrastructure across Queensland's resources communities.

 

"The Palaszczuk government backs the resources industry and we back the jobs and communities that industry is built on," Trad said.

 

"We acknowledge and are grateful for the investment resource companies already make in the communities in which they operate.

 

"Now we want to supplement that investment through a partnership between government and industry to invest even more in regional communities, for the workers and their families who live there."

 

Trad said Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk met some of the state's largest metallurgical coal customers over the final two days on her trade mission to Japan.

 

Yesterday Trad met with mining companies Brisbane.

 

"We can do this because we have relationships with these mining companies that stretch back up to half a century, and because we are always looking for new and better ways to deliver better infrastructure to our resource communities," she said.

 

Trad said her meeting with major mining companies had been very productive.

 

"Today's discussions have been an important and positive step and I look forward to further discussions with the industry to make this Fund a reality," she said.

 

The Queensland Resources Council said it welcomed the government's offer to freeze the royalty rate for three years.

 

A spokesman for the QRC said it would ask its member companies to consider the government's offer along with its request for the resources industry to contribute $70 million to Regional Infrastructure Fund over three years.

 

QRC chief executive Ian Macfarlane said increasing royalties would be an increased tax and attack on the sector that is already supporting one in eight Queensland jobs.

 

"The industry will respond to the government on its proposal as soon as possible," he said.