Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges

AUSTRALIA’S mineral and energy resources industries are well aware of the global challenges humanity faces and do not shy away from accepting their contribution to solving issues such as climate change and environmental degradation, University of New South Wales’ newly-appointed head of Minerals and Energy Resources Engineering Ismet Canbulat says.
Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges Mining engineers of the future facing climate challenges

University of New South Wales’ newly-appointed head of Minerals and Energy Resources Engineering Ismet Canbulat.

He said the school was providing industry with graduates with the knowledge and skills to meet the challengers of the future, particularly regarding energy transitions.

"This means we are working towards achieving clean coal and oil use, improving the economic feasibility of renewables, mining the essential minerals, and increasing natural gas use with carbon capture, utilisation and storage, which will effectively provide a zero-emission fossil fuel," he said.

Canbulat said the school was proud of driving the national agenda across the breadth of minerals and energy resources engineering, and, in doing so, enhancing the quality of life for humanity in a sustainable way.

The combination of Australia's wealth of resources and the world's ongoing need for energy and minerals, means career opportunities for petroleum and mining engineers have never been as broad or exciting in scope.

He said the disciplines had also never been more important.

"As engineers and problem solvers working to improve the effectiveness of the resources sector, we contribute to the overall health of the Australian economy," he said.

 "This is a significant and worthwhile, responsibility."