Floods to escalate skills shortage

RECENT flooding on the east coast will only intensify current skills shortages in the construction and engineering sectors, according to the Clarius Skills Index.
Floods to escalate skills shortage Floods to escalate skills shortage Floods to escalate skills shortage Floods to escalate skills shortage Floods to escalate skills shortage

 

Kristie Batten

The report, prepared by KPMG Econtech, shows an estimated shortfall of close to 4900 construction tradespeople, 600 building and engineering professionals, and 100 building and engineering associate professionals in the December quarter.

The index eased slightly in the period, but executive general manager of Clarius’ engineering and building services division SouthTech Phil Desmet said skills shortages continued to emerge in a number of sectors, which will be further impacted by flood-recovery demand.

“While the demand resulting from the floods is unknown as the full implications are still being assessed, we expect strong demand particularly from the mining and construction sectors,” he said.

The mining industries experienced a 12.5% increase in skilled migration, mainly in Western Australia.

The report said skilled migration would be crucial to tackling future skills shortages.

The average weekly wage was highest in the mining industry at $A2088 a week.

“The resources boom has seen the demand for miners continue to increase, along with accountants and lawyers, as firms search for future leaders,” the report said.

“In line with the increased demand, these occupations are expected to receive the highest pay increases in 2011.”

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